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, mississippi. >> okay. i went to school, both public school as well as my undergraduate studies in mississippi. >> uh-huh. >> left to do my graduate work in seminary in washington, d.c. deferred a bachelor program to come back and do work in mississippi. i wanted to talk about the intersection of privilege, poverty and politics. and so because religion, politics, money are not the most important conversations to bring up around the dinner table, i knew that i would have a colorful experience, if you would, coming back home to address these challenges. >> i see. the sacred or the spiritual and the secular in the streets and the scriptures. >> absolutely. >> that's what you try to combine in your sermon. >> that's correct. making connections between not only the ideals that can be lifted into the rafters but make them make sense in people's lived experience. to talk about things that really matter is what i believe life is about. faith traditions at their best do the work of inviting people to reflect on losty ideals of making them make sense in their lived experience. >> i like that. >> so it's
that day. >> we must get in this revolution, and complete the revolution. for in the delta of mississippi, in southwest georgia, the black belt of alabama, in harlem, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis. and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to
. she was married to another man. they ran away to the mississippi area and live together. he claims that they were married. campaign, and became a big issue and jackson never got over it. all of her life, she was embarrassed by it. she smoked a pipe. she was an excellent plantation manager. on the public side of things, no. she was very hurt by it. judge overton, a best friend of the family, wrote an essay about the scandal of not being married. they did remarry. he invited them to marry. that theyton said went to mississippi and, as they say, they were married. he would not go any further than that. >> what andrew jackson do after his term? had his wife tossed emily. she died in the second administration. oversaw the margaret o'neill scandal. known of loose morals married a member of the cabinet. they would not accept or. -- her. she had authority. the women would not call on her or receive her. mrs. jackson was not treated that way. but, peggy was not a very nice person. >> national. ille.shv jackson died 1828. he is writing to his friend and he describes the onset of rachel's ill
of several historical novels he spoke for a little more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson maybe more so than any other is what took place 40 miles west of here and that is what i want to talk about tonight. at vicksburg, so this is quite a story and even some people around here don't know it. that is great fun for me but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention whenever i'm doing any event like this. i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason, because at of some time many years ago perhaps you read a book called the killer angels. every time i say that i see people nod their heads. you have no idea what the killer angels is that's okay. it's not required. i'll explain it to you quickly. the killer angels was written by my father and came out in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now with the killer angels is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. it's not a history book. it's the story as told to you from the characters themselves and not just any cha
. they ran away to the natchez-mississippi area, the territory. and lived together and later claimed they were married. campaign, it became a real issue and jackson never got over it because he said it ultimately. all her life, she was embarrassed by it. she was a pioneer woman, she a pipe, a corn cob pipe. and was a very excellent plantation manager. the public side of things, no. and she was very, very hurt by it. now, judge overton, the best riend of the family, wrote an essay about the scandal of the not being married because they did remarry. advised them to marry when jackson became famous and that tennessee. the whole detail. he gets up. goes to mississippi, to natchez. say, they were married. he wouldn't go any further than that. >> what did andrew jackson do the rest of his term? two terms, really? as far as the first lady? hostess? wife's niece for the second administration. he died in the second administration. she was popular. but she left over the flutter of the margaret o'neill scandal of very loose he -- a morals -- known for loose morals. he married a member of the th
jackson mississippi, good morning. yes, i am a conservative republican from mississippi. i agree with the doctor earlier. i think obamacare is very bad. it is going to go down naturally. i am not for a government shutdown i am for tying it to and doing asing the conservative republicans will done. i think we ought to way entitlements and electric public and in 2014. i am not for a government shutdown and i am not for obamacare. i am tying it to the debt ceiling. host: that is the strategy as far as speaker boehner is concerned. caller: i think that is what we should do. eastern and central time zones and mountain pacific time zones are the options. the numbers are on your screen, you can call the one that best represents you. for and worth -- foreign affairs released a story in the washington post this morning, talking about a reunion of families on both sides in korea -- calls, this is john from idaho, good morning. i believe that republicans are missing an opportunity right now to win if wehe government and make president obama passed the health care and not give people voucher
of us were arrested and jailed in mississippi during the freedom ride. a bus was set on fire in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed, but we helped bring them in to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 196 1963 as the new chairmanf the student non-violent committee. we met with president kennedy, who said the frustration throughout america. in 1963 we cannot because of the color of our skin. we had t to pay a tax, pass a tt because of the color of our skin and pass a vote in jelly beans in a jar. thousand of people were arrested trying to participate in the integration process. many innocent were killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28, 1963, the nation's capitol was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surroundedded this city, little stores were closed, but the march was so orderly, so peaceful it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believe in a way of peace, the way of l
's not a pretty picture. here's just one example. three men on a summer's day in mississippi. why are they smiling and what are they really up to? yes, that's former president bill clinton on the right and on the left, his best friend forever, terry mcauliffe, former chairman of the democratic national committee, fundraiser supreme for both bill and hillary, and the personification of the corporate wing of the democratic party. smack in the middle, that's haley barbour, former chairman of the republican national committee. he made a fortune lobbying for corporations, especially for the ta backco industry, then went home to serve two terms as governor of mississippi, and couldn't wait to get back to washington, where once again, he's gun-slinging for the big boys. so why did these three d.c. desperadoes ride into a small mississippi town? seems that when barbour was governor, he offered mcauliffe a very attractive state package of price and tax subsidies for a plant there to build electric cars for his greentech automotive company. mcauliffe also tapped his politically connected network for more th
. the sad thing when i was in the georgia legislature we used to say thank god for mississippi because mississippi was always worse than georgia. now we have to say thank god for north carolina because north carolina has become the new mississippi. >> you know, brian, let's talk about north carolina. north carolina up until recently was seen as a sort of a bastion of progressism of the south. yet north carolina now is not exactly a bastion of anything progressive. >> no. i think that's right. one of the scary things for people who are committed to civil rights in this country is that the pace of which we have retreated from basic protections. what i'm most concerned about is these legislatures a lot of them in the south and other parts of the country actually take pride in their resistance to responding to the challenges that face people of color, that face the poor, that face the disadvantaged. they are proud of the fact that they are creating barriers to voting. in north carolina there was something called the racial justice act that was design to deal with the horrific disparities w
i. once we got past 63 and 64 in saint augustine when the mob turned on the press and in mississippi when people like all good got fired by abc because he would not cover -- abc was still running the story, forgive me, that these three civil rights workers were hiding to get attention and he knew that they had been killed. he lost his job over that. i had to pull nelson at and out of a mob in saint augustine to keep them from being enough. a danish reporter got hit in the camera either by a baseball at and knocked his eye socket out. it was ruthless and brutal for the press. press.s the national the written press never quite believed what they saw. to have press conferences at 9:00 in the morning to say what we were going to do and then the demonstrations would start around 1030 and that 1:00, we would tell them what we did, why we did it, and we would answer questions but they would still -- they could not believe that martin luther king was as , as much of aent selfless man that he actually was. >> in 1961, may 20, when we arrived in montgomery during the freedom ride at the greyho
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
father and sister said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
, several other states said we made a big mistake. and mississippi had already done a better job than many and has now mandated its civil rights to be taught in all of the high schools in mississippi to read a great step forward for the state of mississippi which had -- north carolina has become the new mississippi now. so mississippi lost its place. i will let someone else answer the question. that is one of my students. a bright young man. >> i would just say it is the story itself at morehouse college for sure. we are going on line with some things and converging the expertise and the brain power. we have one of our professor. a couple things have happened in the country recently. the monument here in washington was about $120 million. and then the civil rights museum in atlanta. here is morehouse college that built a chapel in 1979 with a statute out front. we say that we need to convert more resources to really undergird this tradition at morehouse and that is what we are going to do. >> my name is jane and i had the honor of working at the brookings institution previously give it my
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
in mississippi. >> guyot: people talked about his being from mississippi, being poor. >> his mother was a teenaged bride. they picked cotton, they worked the land. that's a hard living. >> barry: and i grew up dirt, dirt, dirt, dirt poor. did all kind of odd jobs, you know, hustling pop bottles. back in the day you could get old rags and sell them too. >> guyot: people talked about his lifting himself up by his bootstraps and... >> reporter: you were an eagle scout, you were a member of the national honor society, you played varsity basketball, you received a masters in chemistry, you were on your way to a doctorate and then you shifted gears. >> barry: i think that movement was the catalyst and the lightning rod for the country, and i'm proud to have been a part of it. >> guyot: his civil rights work resonated with people that a lot of other things wouldn't have resonated with. >> johnson: he had instant credibility. as well he should have. >> effi: i don't know if i should say it, but we were living together, i said, "well, what are we going to do? i mean, you know, you can't be l
, mississippi and several other places. >> julian, do you remember? >> several people supporting the march were asked to donate staff to the march and i was donated to the march on washington committee. got john's speech, the original speech -- that went to members of the press who were seated down below lincoln. i passed out the copies of john's speech. i pointed out to them that john would be the only speaker speaking that day to talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people. i thought and we thought this demonstration showed how different we were and superior we were to the other civil rights organizations. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? vix i meant aggressive. i did not mean anything harmful. i have always been upset by people who say "oh, you are so militant." it is not equate abu with violence. it just means someone aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. i thought we were more militant than the other groups gathered there. >> what was the magic of dr. king? martin luther king jr., more than any other leader of our times, had the capacity and the to define, but
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
and jailed in mississippi during the freedom ride. our bus was set on four in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed. but we helped bring an end to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 1963 with the big six as the new chairman of the student nonviolent coordinating committee. we met with president kennedy. in 1963 -- we had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test. count the number of jelly beans in a jar. hundreds of thousands of people were arrested and jailed throughout the south in trying to participate in the democratic process. that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington. to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surrounded the city. liquor stores were closed. residents were told to stay home that day. but the march was so orderly, so peaceful. it was filled with dignity and self-respect. because we believe in the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. people
against civil rights. the state of mississippi, which had given fdr something like 95% of the vote gave goldwater 84% in 1964, the guy who participated in the filibuster. >> then the voting rights act of '65 was so important because that changed the face of government in the united states. just like you may have handed the south over to the gop for all those decades, but you really changed -- you changed the united states of america, you know, i think as a result of the better. >> he might have changed party labels but we need to understand that, you know, racism is racism, no matter if it's a democrat or republican. so, the notion that he signed the party away for 30 years, you know, brings me back to the moment of, what's your responsibility of the civil rights leader? that that was a political calculation that lindyn lyndon made. so, yes, this may cost the democratic party, but eventually we believe it's going to benefit the nation. that's where we are today. >> it is interesting -- what it really did, we say it signed the south away for democrats. in a lot of ways it did. but it sor
is oliver waylon leathers born may 19th in mississippi weighing 7 pounds and 10 ounces. his parents nathan and mary beth are enjoying every minute because he's growing so fast. >> he looks like he says, what happened? >> big congratulations. if you want a chance for your baby to appear in our today's johnson's baby of the week go to klgandhoda for details. >>> it's try day friday. we have our white gloves on. there's some beautiful dancers over here. jubilee dancers. >> should we go join them? >> yes. they are from bally's in las vegas. one of them is catherine. the other is kathy. and the other is kelly ripa. nice to meet you guys. a lot of kathys here today. first of all, you are here in new york doing auditions for other kathys to go to vegas and be a jubilee dancer, right? >> yes. >> what's so difficult to do? >> it's pretty hard. there's lots of kicks. lots of bevels. >> why don't you show us a couple of moves. >> the hardest part is getting the body to look like yours. >> it's not going to fit hoda's head. >> i believe. >> ow, that's got to hurt her. >> it's fine. it's good. no, it's
mississippi. but when it was published in 61864 the country was at war with the south and then two years later appearing in to the title history of the plots and crime. >> to overthrow liberty people were still reeling from the assassination of abraham lincoln and that feels like a conspiracy movie in the '70s received respectful though this is a the your time san "chicago tribune" and the papers praised philadelphia philadelphia, harrisburg, and a pennsylvania even the democratic papered claimed it the most powerful book of the century. and then in them with the letters to warn him all and then one issa this since this started 2.0 he said you be careful of this food you eat and drink can what you take and it was also said to lincoln i have heard it was the undoubted fact that the last two weeks general's harrison and taylor came to their end of what was administered in their plates at the white house. after lincoln died two prominent ministers of detroit in connecticut it were the supposes murders of harrison and taylor and other alleged their assassination for the new york ledger but added s
civil rights workers dead, i knew there was killing in 1964 in mississippi. that's why i think we have to press on. and those of us in the congress have to find a way to fix what the supreme court did. >> rose: john lewis, thank you. >> thank you very much. good to see you. >> rose: the book is called "march." it is a history of the civil rights movement and you will understand more of the trieldz and difficult times and the triumph of the civil rights movement in america as it took place from the streets to legislation in congress to speeches and motivated by the sacrifice of thousands of people. >> i would simply like to say i think this has been one of the great days of america. >> rose: we continue this evening as we take note of the 50th anniversary of the march oning with. on august 28, dr. martin luther king delivered his "i have a dream" speech. it was an american important moment in history, and paved the way for the voting rights act of 1965. half a century later, our first african american president has been elected for a second term but we're still far from realizing equali
lou in greenwood, mississippi, james orange an activist in birmingham, alabama. jose williams. i thought of those people, i thought of baker, and so when i thought of them, i began to cry. i began to cry, because i knew that there contribution had changed america, by the way, i said this directly to the president of the united states. i reminded him yesterday when i had the honor to see him in the reception, even when he was out in california. i -- and you know, he knows this, that when he was elected, for example and there were several people at a faculty home celebrating the election of barack obama. and people in the room started to cry, and someone said to me, professor jones, did you think you live long enough to see an african-american elected president? i said no. but excuse me, my tears are not for the election of barack obama's president. my tears are for all of those persons that i personally knew, personally knew -- i called them wintertime soldiers, who made his election possible. and the president today and even earlier, he reflected that in the very poignant and mov
the context here and the whole climate was set. jim was in jail than mississippi. the sheriff's told the black inmates either beat her or we will be to you. so they beat her unconscious. so there were 200 demonstrations of the country that day and people going to jail. the public accommodations bill, the dream was the right to vote. the dream of 66 was in chicago for housing. the treen at 67 was the poor people's campaign to end the war mike in vietnam. dr. king made the case from 32% down to 12 on the lyndon johnson war on poverty. by the way, our hearts were trained with pain johnson had no background on civil rights. only the civil rights legislator in the history of the country and passed with lyndon johnson and 64 kuhl of the voting rights act of 65, daycare, child-care, speeding programs, appellations, the regional council, all of that is lbj. the record matches are lyndon baines johnson. the speech is always around. from the last staff meeting it went something like this. i had a migraine headache for nine days and maybe my time is up. maybe i've done as much as i could do. maybe i shou
as well. a slight risk of strong storms into the central and upper mississippi river valleys. beautiful weather up in the west coast. 89 >>> 7:36. good tuesday morning to you. meteorologist christina loren. this is san jose. we have the same dark sky just about everywhere. overcast conditions for the first part of the day. we'll see a nice sunny finish. temperatures stay comfortable. 79 degrees on the way to livermore, 80 in fairfield, 77 concord and 74 degrees in beautiful redwood city for today. holding steady through thursday, then we'll crank the heat up come this weekend. hope you have a fantastic day. >>> don't forget any time you need that weather go to the weather channel or weather.com online, savannah. >>> all right. al, thank you so much. this morning on rossen reports, the summer months are peek moving season and some rogue companies are looking to take advantage of it. jeff rossen is on the case. good morning to you. >> we are here to help. a lot of us move. 35 million americans a year and when you hire a moving company you trust them with everything but authorities say com
this morning. sarah thomas, a mother of three from mississippi, on track now to become the first permanent, female nfl official. she's on the field right now, in fact, with new orleans saints, as they go through training camp, honing skills as she awaits that final word that her dreams will finally come true. in those bold black and white stripes, and hair tucked under that black hat, this official looks exactly like every other one on the field. >> watch yourself right here, 17. little tight. little tight. >> reporter: but 39-year-old sarah thomas, a married mother of three, is on the verge of history. >> are you a tomboy? >> i'm a tomboy. yes, but i'm married with two boys. >> reporter: poised to become the first-ever full-time female official for the national football league. >> there's momma. >> 72, you have to come move up on this. put your guard up. >> individually, i'm a female. there's a lot of things that set us apart individually. race, gender. but collectively, we're out there for the same goal. >> reporter: for almost 16 years of officiating grade school, high school and colleg
and great grandfather were lawyers in mississippi and drafted wills for people they said they shouldn't draft wills for, shouldn't go in those african-american houses and draft wills for them. it helped me understand, my skin may ab different color but we're all part of the human race. we've got to do better. my god, i've been so touched by everything this weekend it's indescribable. >> you absolutely set the table for us here. i appreciate how generous you've been with your intergenerational study, that we're always standing here with our parents and our children. and that you have lost your child is unspeakable. that you are here together and you are continuing to parent him, despite his loss, is extraordinary. i appreciate you continue thoug >> right. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. >> thank you, very, very kch. >> thank you all for being here and for sharing every part of your story. >>> up next, my father shares his memory of the march on washington with me and the moment he will never forget. we'll be right back. for a strong bag that grips the can... get glad forceflex. s
down to alabama and mississippi and tennessee to unionized those work places with the new german model. tracy: they want to have a decision team that sits on the company's board? it sounds crazy. >> also work councils and different groups like that and they say it works in germany but those jobs have moved from tennessee -- from germany to tennessee and their growth rate has them lower than ours even a we have not had a very good growth rate recently as 1.7% tracy: i understand the logic. they come to tennessee purposely because it is right to work not to do with the union nonsense but said the union thinks we can convince them otherwise? >> exactly also the auto companies and the south are adding workers nissan has 5,000 and one to add another 2,000. of they are expanding by at jeep is moving to new china for the export market not even expanding in ohio to one that is crazy but your point that membership has fallen with 11 percent of the work force in the unit is down from 20%. >> and only 6 percent of private-sector workers are in the union right ow. tracy: what is the incentive to
into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing people closer together, making it much easier to get cross-country. host: here are a few of the big things that h
, they essentially came the storm troopers of the movement. able to the mississippi delta were other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her. fannie lou hamer after the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, ma who, by her own account, by report went to school only one day, created, in her entire life. i would are used by one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. a speech that she gave at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can you do it. if you have not heard it, here it. because it is the most eloquent statement that i have heard, courageous woman and is deathly her paper think if we move from a national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of, i was the one of the most exciting things about being sort of doing this history, being involved in a scholarly production of literacy about the civil rights movement is about a lot of really good stuff that is coming out that's talked about his local activists, were anonymous for the most part but without them he would not affect a national movement. and i think it was to go back to the p
over the mississippi river, 16 feet more to go. i could watch this go down the nation's greatest river. it was an awesome view. the people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. he represents pennsylvania's ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. thanks for that great example that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. we look forward to those engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. as i have traveled around the coeeg what other
to the ozark hills and wright county, douglas, to the banks of the mississippi river, one of the largest concerns that my constituents have is the uncertainty surrounding the affordable care act. individuals are concerned about the relationship with their doctor and what their costs are going to be. businesses are left with the tremendous uncertainty. they are understaffed because they are afraid to hire additional employees and they're also firing employees just to fall below the 50 individual threshold. the effects of the affordable care act are adversely affecting the health care and jobs and the folks across this great country. that is why i'm offering my amendment to revise the definition of major regulations to include any regulation under the affordable care act with over 3,000 pages of federal regulations already issued and many more to follow, congress must prevent this widely unsupportive law from causing further damage to our health care system. mr. speaker, there is broad partisan opposition to the affordable care act. the administration has demonstrated its own certainty thr
. louisiana, mississippi, what is happening in some of those states? >> that is an important point, one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. the expert we will hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have gone to the south, other than -- shunned the south, other than texas. that has been a problem. now, you are seeing dixie really attracting a lot of the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states with the biggest percentage increase of immigration over the last 15 years has been georgia. it has become a high-growth state. people at, are immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits, or are they attracted to a state that has jobs? we look at some of the evidence, and what we found was, on balance, immigrants are much more likely to go to states with unemployment rates than they are to go to states with welfare. they are coming here because they want a job, not a welfare check. >> it makes logical sense. if you are to leave your country and make out somewhere new -- >> there are so many people on the other side of the
, they have become more eligible. host: the next call is from mississippi. appreciate mrly his comments. however, education starts and home. we have to focus on poor choices. we have all made them. we cannot continue this charade of talking around the mountain. you go through the mountain. you only go through with the word to the wise. focus on the fundamentals. we have to educate children at a young age and raise them properly. then we do not have children having children. we have to stop this in schools. this is not teaching 10 year-old kids in school to pick up the morning after pill. this is not rocket science. it is life or death. i do not worship death. i know the good doctor does not either. besharov.las guest: the challenge with the social programs is to help those in need without generating greater need. that affects every program we have. infects foreign aid. it is a challenge. i wish we could understand a balance has to be drawn. we do not seem to be doing that. host: the programs were heavy on because- dairy republican dairy farmers wanted government regulation to force sell
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